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Local Dishes in Kyushu Area / Okinawa Area

Gu-zoni(Nagasaki)  New

Gu-zoni 

This is a traditional soup made in the Shimabara region of Nagasaki. Besides pounded sticky-rice cakes (mochi), it also includes morsels of meat, slices of pounded fish cake, and a selection of vegetables. It is served at New Year's, and also at ceremonial events and formal celebrations throughout the year.

 

Buri no atsumeshi(Oita) 

Buri no atsumeshi 

One of the best-known specialties of Fukuoka Prefecture. Chicken including skin and bones is coarsely chopped, placed in cold water, and slowly brought to a boil. This is eaten with a ponzu dip, a zesty mix of soy sauce with citron juice. When the ingredients have been eaten, the leftover soup is cooked up with rice to make porridge, or poured over rice (similar to chazuke; tea over cooked rice).

Mizutaki(Fukuoka) 

Mizutaki 

One of the best-known specialties of Fukuoka Prefecture. Chicken including skin and bones is coarsely chopped, placed in cold water, and slowly brought to a boil. This is eaten with a ponzu dip, a zesty mix of soy sauce with citron juice. When the ingredients have been eaten, the leftover soup is cooked up with rice to make porridge, or poured over rice (similar to chazuke; tea over cooked rice).

Suko-zushi(Saga) 

Suko-zushi

Pressed sushi made with local Shiroishi rice and topped with slices of raw fish freshly caught from the nearby Ariake Sea. The fish is divided into portions about 10 cm square and decorated with colorful slivers of vegetables. This is a traditional recipe dating back some 500 years, first prepared by farmers as an offering to the local lord of the Suko region.

Keihan(Kagoshima)

keihan

 

Ikinari-dago(Kumamoto)

Ikinari-dago(Kumamoto)

Okinawa soba(Okinawa)

Okinawa soba(Okinawa)

Jidori no sumibiyaki(Miyazaki)

Jidori no sumibiyaki(Miyazaki)

Shippoku ryori(Nagasaki)

 Shippoku ryori

During the Edo Period, Nagasaki was the only Japanese port open to trade with the outside world and developed a cosmopolitan character. The shippoku ryori style of cooking was adapted from traditional formal banquets in ancient China. Circular tables are arranged with a mix of Japanese delicacies, Chinese-style dishes, and also foods introduced by European traders.

Goya champuru(Okinawa)

 Goya champuru

In the Okinawan dialect champuru means "mixture." Goya champuru is a stir-fried mixture of sliced goya (bitter melon) and local tofu, with slices of pork. It is so popular it is considered the staple dish of Okinawa.

Others

Gu-zoni

Gu-zoni (Nagasaki)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pictures and articles are cited from JAPAN'S TASTY SECRETS.

 

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